NYS Next Generation Learning Samples

Yours to tryfree: Performance tasks that connect both the NYS Next Generation Learning Standards and Mathematical Practices. Featuring differentiated instructional tasks and summative assessments with anchor papers, these engaging tasks let every student build their skills through solving real-world DOK 3-level problems.

The samples below are aligned to NYS Next Generation Learning Standards and include problem-solving performance tasks, teacher planning sheets, rubrics, student anchor papers, and scoring rationales. They reflect just a few of the 500+ tasks in Problem Solving for the 21st Century: Built for the NYS Next Generation Learning Standards.

Kindergarten

NY-K.CC.B.5a

Grade 1

NY-1.OA.A.1

NY-1.OA.A.1

Use addition and subtraction within 20 to solve one-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and/or comparing, with unknowns in all positions.

Note: Problems should be represented using objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number. Problems should be solved using objects or drawings, and equations.

Grade 2

NY-2.OA.A.1a

NY-2.OA.A.1a

Use addition and subtraction within 100 to solve one-step word problems involving situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all positions.

e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

Grade 3

NY-3.OA.A.3

Grade 4

NY-4.OA.A.3

Grade 5

NY-5.NBT.B.6

NY-5.NBT.B.6

Find whole-number quotients of whole numbers with up to four-digit dividends and two-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

Notes on and/or:

  • Students should be taught to use strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and the relationship between multiplication and division; however, when solving any problem, students can choose any strategy.
  • Students should be taught to use equations, rectangular arrays, and area models; however, when illustrating and explaining any calculation, students can choose any strategy.